Mighty Leaf Tea
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Brewing & Storing Tea

Brewing Methods

After thousands of years, the traditional teapot still brews up the perfect cup. Here are some secrets for preparing the highest quality tea using a teapot.

Teapots for tea types:

We recommend that you dedicate one teapot for only one type of tea: one for black, green and herbals. Pots can become seasoned by black teas and if you prepare other styles of tea, like green, in the same pot, it may affect the flavor.

Teapot serving size:

Other factors to consider when thinking about tea preparation is how many cups you will be serving. It is best to have both a small and large teapot - a small one for single cup and a larger one for multiple cup servings.

The Mighty Leaf Tea Pouch:

Mighty Leaf Tea Pouches are designed to accommodate 12 oz of water or a small teapot that usually matches the same quantity.

Teapots are made out of a variety of materials including cast-iron, clay, glass, porcelain, silver and earthenware. Whether it is tea culture in China, Japan or other countries, each respective tradition involves preparing and drinking tea in distinctive way, including the kind of teapot used.

Cast-iron Teapots

Japanese cast-iron teapots, also known as Tetsubin, were originally used in the home for boiling water and heat. Crafted using casting traditions dating back to the mid 17th century, these teapots are thought to be modeled on copper kettles commonly used during the time period. In the 18th century, the Tetsubin’s use and function evolved in conjunction with the introduction of a new tea ritual - preparing tea as we know it today by infusing tea leaves in boiling water.

Before, tea was primarily consumed in powdered form, also known as Matcha. During 17th century, a Chinese monk traveling in Japan brought a new rolled form of tea that had replaced powdered tea in China. A tea merchant in Uji, Kyoto, Nagatani Soen invented a new Japanese method of steaming, drying and rolling green tea during the 18th century. This tea and style of processing became known as Sencha.

The ritual of drinking tea in Japan become more casual and accessible to the everyday person versus the more formal Japanese Tea Ceremony that involved Matcha and specific tea utensils hailing from China. The use of the Testubin accompanied the rise of a new tea market in Japan that catered to a growing tea drinking public. In the 19th century, Tetsubin became a kind of status symbol as multitudes of handmade and intricate designs flourished. Over time, the teapots were viewed as works of art, handcrafted by master artisans using well honed skills and traditional cast iron forging techniques passed on from generation to generation.

The Tetsubin teapots are well suited for brewing green teas like Dragonwell and Kyoto Rice. Often fired with enamel interiors, these long lasting teapots do not impart any flavor, retain heat well and heat evenly. With a metal infuser, the cast-iron teapots are also easy to use and make monitoring the steeping time simple.

Care and Use:

  • Do not use teapot on the stove
  • Using a tea kettle, heat the water for tea. Pre-heat the teapot by filling it with hot water and then drain
  • Place loose tea into the removable infuser. The leaves will have ample space to unfurl freely
  • Fill with hot water fired to the temperature and steeping time as required by the particular tea type.
  • Savor the whole leaf tea by pouring it into a teacup. To clean, rinse the teapot with cold water and wipe dry with a cloth. Do not use dish detergents or soap, as it may interfere with the seasoned flavor of the teapot.

Yixing Clay Teapots

Chinese Yixing clay teapots are famous for their diversity of unique styles, shapes and colors. Handmade of unglazed terra cotta, the porous nature of the clay will take on the flavor, smell and color of the tea brewed. With each use the teapot becomes more seasoned. Thus, dedicating a single teapot to a particular tea is a must. Yixing teapots are smaller than most teapots, intended for individual use, infusing 1-2 servings.

Care and Use:

Heat water for tea using a kettle.

Pre-heat the teapot by filling it with hot water and then drain

Place one teaspoon of loose tea into the preheated teapot. No infuser is necessary. The leaves will have ample space to unfurl freely

Fill with hot water fired to the temperature and steeping time as required by the particular tea type

Savor the whole leaf tea by pouring it into a teacup. To clean, remove the tea leaves and wash only with hot water. To maintain the seasoned flavor of the teapot avoid washing it with soap.

Stoneware and Ceramic Teapots

Stoneware and ceramic teapots are ideal teapots for everyday use. For example, enjoy your morning cup of tea with whole loose leaf prepared in a teapot using a removable stainless steel infuser or, if no infusion basket is included, a T-Sac paper filter bag. Stoneware and ceramic teapots come in a variety of colors and designs and appeal to many tea drinkers. They can be used to prepare any style of tea including black, oolong, green, white or herbal infusions.

Care and Use

 

  • Do not use teapot on the stove
  • Using a tea kettle, heat the water for tea. Pre-heat the teapot by filling it with hot water and then drain
  • Place loose tea into the removable infuser or if no integrated infusion basket exists, use a paper filter such as the T-Sac Filter Bags. The leaves will have ample space to unfurl freely
  • Fill with hot water fired to the temperature and steeping time as required by the particular tea type
  • Savor the whole leaf tea by pouring it into a teacup.

Glass Teapots

Germany produces many high quality glass teapots. Glass is ideal for retaining heat and brewing flavored teas as the teapot does not retain the tea’s flavor. Glass teapots are also ideal for brewing flowering teas, as you can watch as the tea leaves unfurl before your eyes revealing hidden treasures within and depending upon the tea, its characteristic liquor color.