Mighty Leaf Tea
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Sanctuary
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Sanctuary

Caffeine Level: None

Sanctuary herbal tea infusion delivers the relaxing qualities of vervaine, lemon balm and catmint combined with Vitamin C-rich berries, licorice and lavender in a fragrant blend marked with citrus and spice. Antiseptic and cholesterol reducing, this herbal tea balances the body and mind with each sip.

Loose tea in 4 oz. bag

Ingredients
Lavender, verbena, licorice, lemon balm, catmint, hawthorne berries.

Character

Leaves
Lavender, Hawthorne Berries

Aroma
Cleansing and relaxing

Color
Golden tone

Taste
Smooth, soothing with a sweet finish

Brew
Preparing the perfect cup of tea is a process to be savored. Watch how the traditional elements harmoniously come together to make the perfect cup and enjoy the liberation of pure tea goodness.

This is what we call the Mighty Leaf signature multi-sensory ("sensory melange") tea experience. Come share with us and learn how to get infused.

Water
The quality of tea is affected by the quality of water used to prepare it. Using filtered or bottled water is best. If possible, avoid brewing tea with tap, distilled or mineral water. Never over-boil water, as it results in flat-tasting tea.

Fire
1) Heat filtered or bottled water to a rolling boil or to 205 F. 2) While the water is heating pour hot water into your teapot and cups, let sit and then drain completely. A warm teapot will maintain the requisite temperature for superior tasting tea.

Whole Leaf Tea
Prepare Mighty Leaf teas using a teapot, paper tea sachet, infuser or traditional brewing methods. Use one rounded tablespoon of loose herbs and fruit per 12 ounces or cup of water.

Infusion Time
Pour boiling water over tea leaves. Keep teapot covered to retain heat. Time steeping carefully and infuse for 5 - 7 minutes.

Savor the Leaf
Sip your cup and rediscover the pleasure of the way tea was naturally meant to be. This is the magic of Mighty Leaf.

Origin
United States

Health Benefits

Catmint (nepeta cataria)
Carminative, tonic, diaphoretic, refrigerant and slightly emmenagogue, specially antispasmodic, and mildly stimulating. Producing free perspiration, it is very useful in colds. Catnep Tea is a valuable drink in every case of fever, because of its action in inducing sleep and producing perspiration without increasing the heat of the system. It is good in restlessness, colic, insanity and nervousness, and is used as a mild nervine for children, one of its chief uses being, indeed, in the treatment of children's ailments. The infusion of 1 oz. to a pint of boiling water may be taken by adults in doses of 2 tablespoons, by children in 2 or 3 teaspoons frequently, to relieve pain and flatulence. An injection of Catnep Tea is also used for colicky pains.

The herb should always be infused, boiling will spoil it. Its qualities are somewhat volatile, hence when made it should be covered up. The tea may be drunk freely, but if taken in very large doses when warm, it frequently acts as an emetic. It has proved efficacious in nervous headaches and as an emmenagogue, though for the latter purpose, it is preferable to use Catnep, not as a warm tea, but to express the juice of the green herb and take it in tablespoonful doses, three times a day. An injection of the tea also relieves headache and hysteria, by its immediate action upon the sacral plexus. The young tops, made into a conserve, have been found serviceable for nightmare.

Lavender (lavandula sp.)
Lavender was used in earlier days as a condiment and for flavoring dishes to comfort the stomach. Gerard speaks of Conserves of Lavender being served at table. It has aromatic, carminative and nervine properties. Though largely used in perfumery, it is now not much employed internally, except as a flavoring agent, occurring occasionally in pharmacy to cover disagreeable odors in ointments and other compounds.

Lemon Balm (melissa officinalis)
Carminative, diaphoretic and febrifuge. It induces a mild perspiration and makes a pleasant and cooling tea for feverish patients in cases of catarrh and influenza. To make the tea, pour 1 pint of boiling water upon 1 oz. of herb, infuse 15 minutes, allow to cool, then strain and drink freely. If sugar and a little lemon peel or juice are added it makes a refreshing summer drink. Balm is a useful herb, either alone or in combination with others. It is excellent in colds attended with fever, as it promotes perspiration. Used with salt, it was formerly applied for the purpose of taking away wens, and had the reputation of cleansing sores and easing the pains of gout. John Hussey, of Sydenham, who lived to the age of 116, breakfasted for fifty years on Balm tea sweetened with honey, and herb teas were the usual breakfasts of Llewelyn Prince of Glamorgan, who died in his 108th year. Carmelite water, of which Balm was the chief ingredient, was drunk daily by the Emperor Charles V.

 

Use
Enjoy this naturally caffeine-free blend when you are seeking relaxation. A great blend to brew up at the end of a long day. Pairs well with lamb and poultry dishes as well as vegetables.

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