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Tea Tips

The Many Uses of Tea

Don't Like Black Coffee? Sip Black Tea Instead

Why should I switch from black coffee to black tea?

Many people drink black tea as a substitute for their morning (or afternoon) coffee, sometimes because of its taste and because it's easier on the stomach, but some people prefer it because it can contain a lot of caffeine; in fact, it can pack just as powerful a punch as coffee.

So, the next time you reach for your morning coffee, consider reaching for a black tea bag instead. Your body will thank you.

The Best Times of Day for Tea

When is the best time of day to drink black, chamomile, peppermint, or green tea?

Whether you're unwinding after a long day or feeling under the weather, there's nothing like sitting down and relaxing with a nice, hot cup of tea. From peppermint and chamomile to green and black teas, you have many choices. But different teas are better at different times of the day. Here are some tips for the best times to drink tea:

  • Black tea: morning or afternoon. The caffeine in black tea will give you a burst of energy, so don't drink it before bedtime.
  • Green tea: morning or afternoon. But it does contain caffeine, so try not to drink it in the evening.
  • Peppermint Tea: anytime. Peppermint tea that is brewed solely with peppermint leaves (check the label) is supposed to be great for those with upset stomachs. It's also a great tea to drink while curling up with a good book before bedtime.
  • Chamomile Tea: evening. Although this tea is caffeine-free and can be enjoyed any time of day, it is widely consumed at bedtime because it is said to have a calming effect on the drinker.
So, the next time you reach for a tea bag, consider the time of day before making your choice.

Don't Like Black Coffee? Sip Black Tea Instead

Why should I switch from black coffee to black tea?

Many people drink black tea as a substitute for their morning (or afternoon) coffee, sometimes because of its taste and because it's easier on the stomach, but some people prefer it because it can contain a lot of caffeine; in fact, it can pack just as powerful a punch as coffee.

So, the next time you reach for your morning coffee, consider reaching for a black tea bag instead. Your body will thank you.

Three Different Ways to Enjoy Tea

How do people in different countries fix their tea?

Tea is a many splendid thing, and as such, there are many different ways to enjoy it. Here are just a few ways that different countries fix their tea:

  • India: Tea in India is called Chai and is made up of several different spices, including cardamom and ginger. Tea bags or loose tea is brought to a boil and then milk is added, as well as sugar to taste.
  • China: Although the Chinese have many ways of brewing tea, they typically brew loose tea leaves in a teapot, bring the water to a boil, and drink without any sweetener. Green tea is very popular in China.
  • England: The English are famous for their tea consumption. The typical English cup of tea is made with black tea, using tea bags. The tea bag is placed in a mug, boiling water is poured on top of it, the tea is steeped, and milk and sugar are added to taste.

The Many Wonderful Uses of Tea

What are some of the everyday uses of tea?

Whether it's iced down or piping hot, tea is a great drink. Did you know that there are other ways tea can benefit your everyday life? Check out these other nifty uses for tea:

  • Tired eyes? Soak a tea bag in cold water and then place it on your eyelids for about five minutes. This will help reduce the puffiness in your eyes and make you look more wide awake.
  • Razor burn? Soak a tea bag in lukewarm water and rub it along the affected area to reduce the pain.
  • Toothache? Gargle with peppermint tea to help reduce the pain.
  • Dry hair? Wash your hair with shampoo as normal, rinse, and then wash your hair with a cup of herbal tea. This will add moisture to help your hair shine.
So, the next time you have a toothache, tired eyes, dry hair, or razor burn, turn to your kitchen cabinet and see what tea can do for you.

Get a Taste of India by Brewing Your Own Chai

How do I make Chai Tea?

In India, it's customary to offer tea to every guest who enters your home--even the unexpected ones! When a visitor is presented with a cup of tea, it's usually filled with Chai, a tea brewed with cardamom, ginger, and milk. Chai (or Chai latte as it is referred to in North America) is deliciously aromatic and tastes divine with or without sugar. You can order Chai tea bags from different outlets, but it's not the same as the real thing. If you've never tasted authentic Chai tea, you can either order a cup at your favorite Indian restaurant or brew your own at home. Here's what you will need:

  • 3 tablespoons of classic black tea from MightyLeaf.com
  • 1.5 cups of water
  • 1 inch of a cinnamon stick
  • 8 pods of cardamom
  • 2-3 cloves
  • 1/4 inch of fresh ginger root, sliced
  • 2/3 cup of milk
  • 6 tsp sugar
Directions:

Bring water to a boil, then place ginger, cardamom, and cloves into the pot.

Simmer for 10 minutes.

Add milk and sugar and heat until mixture begins to simmer.

Add black tea leaves and cover pot for 3 minutes.

Once the tea is steeped to your preference, pour tea through a strainer into your mug and enjoy!

Recycle Your Tea Leaves

What can I do with my used tea leaves?

From sustainable furniture and recycled copy paper to hybrid cars and green buildings, the push to recycle and reuse has never been more evident, and you know that every little bit counts. Since you're already recycling your plastic bags and aluminum cans, you may want to explore alternate uses for your used household items. After you've finished your cup of tea, you can reuse the leaves in the tea bags for practical purposes. Try some of these tips to discover the many uses of tea leaves:

  • Foot odor? Immerse your feet in a brew made with used green tea leaves. This can minimize the odor of your feet.
  • Bad breath? If you have a foul taste in your mouth after eating, rinse your mouth out with some cold tea brewed from used green tea leaves.
  • Foul smelling refrigerator? Use sun-dried tea leaves as a deodorizer.
  • Dying plants? Soak used tea leaves in water, then use it to water your plants. Soak the tea leaves in water for a few more days and use the remnants as fertilizer.

Three Ways to Prepare Herbal Tea

How do I make herbal tea?

Brewing herbal tea is an art form, and there are many ways to prepare it. There are many herbal tea uses, and whether you're drinking it for medicinal purposes or strictly for the great taste, refer to your favorite recipe and, for best results, brew your herbal tea in one of these ways:

  1. Infuse your herbal tea by letting it steep for 30 minutes, or steep your tea and then keep it in the refrigerator overnight for a more robust infusion. Drink the tea with the herbs still floating in it.
  2. Boil fresh tea leaves and fresh herbs in water, let them steep for five minutes, then pour the tea into a strainer to keep it free of loose herbs.
  3. Purchase a quality herbal tea, drop the tea bag into a mug, then pour boiling water over it. Let it steep for 5 minutes and then enjoy.

The Best Times of Day for Tea

When is the best time of day to drink black, chamomile, peppermint, or green tea?

Whether you're unwinding after a long day or feeling under the weather, there's nothing like sitting down and relaxing with a nice, hot cup of tea. From peppermint and chamomile to green and black teas, you have many choices. But different teas are better at different times of the day. Here are some tips for the best times to drink tea:

  • Black tea: morning or afternoon. The caffeine in black tea will give you a burst of energy, so don't drink it before bedtime.
  • Green tea: morning or afternoon. But it does contain caffeine, so try not to drink it in the evening.
  • Peppermint Tea: anytime. Peppermint tea that is brewed solely with peppermint leaves (check the label) is supposed to be great for those with upset stomachs. It's also a great tea to drink while curling up with a good book before bedtime.
  • Chamomile Tea: evening. Although this tea is caffeine-free and can be enjoyed any time of day, it is widely consumed at bedtime because it is said to have a calming effect on the drinker.
So, the next time you reach for a tea bag, consider the time of day before making your choice.

The Many Wonderful Uses of Tea

What are some of the everyday uses of tea?

Whether it's iced down or piping hot, tea is a great drink. Did you know that there are other ways tea can benefit your everyday life? Check out these other nifty uses for tea:

  • Tired eyes? Soak a tea bag in cold water and then place it on your eyelids for about five minutes. This will help reduce the puffiness in your eyes and make you look more wide awake.
  • Razor burn? Soak a tea bag in lukewarm water and rub it along the affected area to reduce the pain.
  • Toothache? Gargle with peppermint tea to help reduce the pain.
  • Dry hair? Wash your hair with shampoo as normal, rinse, and then wash your hair with a cup of herbal tea. This will add moisture to help your hair shine.
So, the next time you have a toothache, tired eyes, dry hair, or razor burn, turn to your kitchen cabinet and see what tea can do for you.

Three Different Ways to Enjoy Tea

How do people in different countries fix their tea?

Tea is a many splendid thing, and as such, there are many different ways to enjoy it. Here are just a few ways that different countries fix their tea:

  • India: Tea in India is called Chai and is made up of several different spices, including cardamom and ginger. Tea bags or loose tea is brought to a boil and then milk is added, as well as sugar to taste.
  • China: Although the Chinese have many ways of brewing tea, they typically brew loose tea leaves in a teapot, bring the water to a boil, and drink without any sweetener. Green tea is very popular in China.
  • England: The English are famous for their tea consumption. The typical English cup of tea is made with black tea, using tea bags. The tea bag is placed in a mug, boiling water is poured on top of it, the tea is steeped, and milk and sugar are added to taste.

Recycle Your Tea Leaves

What can I do with my used tea leaves?

From sustainable furniture and recycled copy paper to hybrid cars and green buildings, the push to recycle and reuse has never been more evident, and you know that every little bit counts. Since you're already recycling your plastic bags and aluminum cans, you may want to explore alternate uses for your used household items. After you've finished your cup of tea, you can reuse the leaves in the tea bags for practical purposes. Try some of these tips to discover the many uses of tea leaves:

  • Foot odor? Immerse your feet in a brew made with used green tea leaves. This can minimize the odor of your feet.
  • Bad breath? If you have a foul taste in your mouth after eating, rinse your mouth out with some cold tea brewed from used green tea leaves.
  • Foul smelling refrigerator? Use sun-dried tea leaves as a deodorizer.
  • Dying plants? Soak used tea leaves in water, then use it to water your plants. Soak the tea leaves in water for a few more days and use the remnants as fertilizer.

Get a Taste of India by Brewing Your Own Chai

How do I make Chai Tea?

In India, it's customary to offer tea to every guest who enters your home--even the unexpected ones! When a visitor is presented with a cup of tea, it's usually filled with Chai, a tea brewed with cardamom, ginger, and milk. Chai (or Chai latte as it is referred to in North America) is deliciously aromatic and tastes divine with or without sugar. You can order Chai tea bags from different outlets, but it's not the same as the real thing. If you've never tasted authentic Chai tea, you can either order a cup at your favorite Indian restaurant or brew your own at home. Here's what you will need:

  • 3 tablespoons of classic black tea from MightyLeaf.com
  • 1.5 cups of water
  • 1 inch of a cinnamon stick
  • 8 pods of cardamom
  • 2-3 cloves
  • 1/4 inch of fresh ginger root, sliced
  • 2/3 cup of milk
  • 6 tsp sugar
Directions:

Bring water to a boil, then place ginger, cardamom, and cloves into the pot.

Simmer for 10 minutes.

Add milk and sugar and heat until mixture begins to simmer.

Add black tea leaves and cover pot for 3 minutes.

Once the tea is steeped to your preference, pour tea through a strainer into your mug and enjoy!

Three Ways to Prepare Herbal Tea

How do I make herbal tea?

Brewing herbal tea is an art form, and there are many ways to prepare it. There are many herbal tea uses, and whether you're drinking it for medicinal purposes or strictly for the great taste, refer to your favorite recipe and, for best results, brew your herbal tea in one of these ways:

  1. Infuse your herbal tea by letting it steep for 30 minutes, or steep your tea and then keep it in the refrigerator overnight for a more robust infusion. Drink the tea with the herbs still floating in it.
  2. Boil fresh tea leaves and fresh herbs in water, let them steep for five minutes, then pour the tea into a strainer to keep it free of loose herbs.
  3. Purchase a quality herbal tea, drop the tea bag into a mug, then pour boiling water over it. Let it steep for 5 minutes and then enjoy.

Recycle Your Tea Leaves

What can I do with my used tea leaves?

From sustainable furniture and recycled copy paper to hybrid cars and green buildings, the push to recycle and reuse has never been more evident, and you know that every little bit counts. Since you're already recycling your plastic bags and aluminum cans, you may want to explore alternate uses for your used household items. After you've finished your cup of tea, you can reuse the leaves in the tea bags for practical purposes. Try some of these tips to discover the many uses of tea leaves:

  • Foot odor? Immerse your feet in a brew made with used green tea leaves. This can minimize the odor of your feet.
  • Bad breath? If you have a foul taste in your mouth after eating, rinse your mouth out with some cold tea brewed from used green tea leaves.
  • Foul smelling refrigerator? Use sun-dried tea leaves as a deodorizer.
  • Dying plants? Soak used tea leaves in water, then use it to water your plants. Soak the tea leaves in water for a few more days and use the remnants as fertilizer.

Folk Remedies Using Ginger Tea

What are some folk remedies using ginger tea?

Ginger tea has been lauded for its medicinal properties for centuries. It has been documented that early civilizations, such as the Chinese and the Indians, utilized ginger as a remedy for colds, sore throats, and general sinus pain. There are many supposed medicinal ginger tea uses. It is said to have been successfully used as:

  • An expectorant
  • A laxative
  • A stimulant
  • An anti-flatulent
  • A migraine reliever
  • An aid for digestion
  • A nausea reducer (used during pregnancy)
If you perform a search online, you will discover thousands of different folk recipes utilizing ginger. Generally, the recipes involve the ingestion of ginger as a tea with pieces of ginger root, sprinkles of ginger powder, or a ginger-infused tea bag. It is also used in other forms. The Greeks would eat parts of the root wrapped in a piece of bread to aid digestion post-meal. The English brewed ginger beer for the same purpose. Today, some people convert ginger into an oil to rub on their joints to relieve pain.

So the next time you get sick, you might want to take a tip from centuries of history and drink some ginger tea.

Feel Dandy Again with Dandelion Tea

What are some of the perceived health benefits of dandelion tea?

The dandelion is what you would call a "pretty" weed. It's yellow and cute, but still destructive to our grass, so we take steps to exterminate them, however begrudgingly. But did you know that the dandelion isn't only a pesky weed? It's also used as a medicinal tool in some cultures.

So, before you start killing off those dandelions around your property, consider this:

The dandelion has been used for centuries to treat and prevent ailments. It has been noted that the Celts introduced it to the Romans during Caesar's time. It was also used by the Anglo Saxons to prevent scurvy. It was even consumed as a vegetable by the English colonists in North America.

Today, dandelion tea is used as a supplemental treatment for ailments ranging from urinary tract infections and gall bladder issues to appetite disorders and potassium deficiency. Many people who have been diagnosed with these ailments drink dandelion tea in addition to their course of treatment. The dandelion is also largely cultivated in India as a treatment for various liver disorders.

Even if you don't have any of the ailments listed above, dandelion tea is delicious in its own right. To get some of your own, order dandelion tea bags online at MightyLeaf.com and enjoy!

Don't Like Black Coffee? Sip Black Tea Instead

Why should I switch from black coffee to black tea?

Many people drink black tea as a substitute for their morning (or afternoon) coffee, sometimes because of its taste and because it's easier on the stomach, but some people prefer it because it can contain a lot of caffeine; in fact, it can pack just as powerful a punch as coffee. There are also many added health benefits to changing from coffee to black tea.

The benefits of green tea, including its antioxidant properties and cardiovascular benefits, have been widely reported. The benefits from drinking black tea, however, have not been as widely publicized. Recent studies, as reported by leading medical journals, show that black tea can be effective as a cancer blocker, a cardiovascular booster, and an immune system stimulant in addition to providing other health benefits.

So, the next time you reach for your morning coffee, consider reaching for a black tea bag instead. Your body will thank you.

The Best Times of Day for Tea

When is the best time of day to drink black, chamomile, peppermint, or green tea?

Whether you're unwinding after a long day or feeling under the weather, there's nothing like sitting down and relaxing with a nice, hot cup of tea. From peppermint and chamomile to green and black teas, you have many choices. But different teas are better at different times of the day. Here are some tips for the best times to drink tea:

  • Black tea: morning or afternoon. The caffeine in black tea will give you a burst of energy, so don't drink it before bedtime.
  • Green tea: morning or afternoon. Green tea is an antioxidant with many other purported health benefits. It can be great for your health, but it does contain caffeine, so try not to drink it in the evening.
  • Peppermint Tea: anytime. Peppermint tea that is brewed solely with peppermint leaves (check the label) is supposed to be great for those with upset stomachs. It's also a great tea to drink while curling up with a good book before bedtime.
  • Chamomile Tea: evening. Although this tea is caffeine-free and can be enjoyed any time of day, it is widely consumed at bedtime because it is said to have a calming effect on the drinker.
So, the next time you reach for a tea bag, consider the time of day before making your choice.

The Many Wonderful Uses of Tea

What are some of the everyday uses of tea?

Whether it's iced down or piping hot, tea is a great drink. We've all heard of the health benefits of tea, but did you know that there are other ways tea can benefit your everyday life? Check out these other nifty uses for tea:

  • Tired eyes? Soak a tea bag in cold water and then place it on your eyelids for about five minutes. This will help reduce the puffiness in your eyes and make you look more wide awake.
  • Razor burn? Soak a tea bag in lukewarm water and rub it along the affected area to reduce the pain.
  • Toothache? Gargle with peppermint tea to help reduce the pain.
  • Dry hair? Wash your hair with shampoo as normal, rinse, and then wash your hair with a cup of herbal tea. This will add moisture to help your hair shine.
So, the next time you have a toothache, tired eyes, dry hair, or razor burn, turn to your kitchen cabinet and see what tea can do for you.

Three Different Ways to Enjoy Tea

How do people in different countries fix their tea?

Tea is a many splendid thing, and as such, there are many different ways to enjoy it. Here are just a few ways that different countries fix their tea:

  • India: Tea in India is called Chai and is made up of several different spices, including cardamom and ginger. Tea bags or loose tea is brought to a boil and then milk is added, as well as sugar to taste.
  • China: Although the Chinese have many ways of brewing tea, they typically brew loose tea leaves in a teapot, bring the water to a boil, and drink without any sweetener. Green tea is very popular in China.
  • England: The English are famous for their tea consumption. The typical English cup of tea is made with black tea, using tea bags. The tea bag is placed in a mug, boiling water is poured on top of it, the tea is steeped, and milk and sugar are added to taste.

Get a Taste of India by Brewing Your Own Chai

How do I make Chai Tea?

In India, it's customary to offer tea to every guest who enters your home--even the unexpected ones! When a visitor is presented with a cup of tea, it's usually filled with Chai, a tea brewed with cardamom, ginger, and milk. Chai (or Chai latte as it is referred to in North America) is deliciously aromatic and tastes divine with or without sugar. You can order Chai tea bags from different outlets, but it's not the same as the real thing. If you've never tasted authentic Chai tea, you can either order a cup at your favorite Indian restaurant or brew your own at home. Here's what you will need:

  • 3 tablespoons of classic black tea from MightyLeaf.com
  • 1.5 cups of water
  • 1 inch of a cinnamon stick
  • 8 pods of cardamom
  • 2-3 cloves
  • 1/4 inch of fresh ginger root, sliced
  • 2/3 cup of milk
  • 6 tsp sugar
Directions:

Bring water to a boil, then place ginger, cardamom, and cloves into the pot.

Simmer for 10 minutes.

Add milk and sugar and heat until mixture begins to simmer.

Add black tea leaves and cover pot for 3 minutes.

Once the tea is steeped to your preference, pour tea through a strainer into your mug and enjoy!

Drink to Your Health With Green Tea

Is green tea good for my health?

Everyone knows that green tea is an antioxidant, but what many people don't know is the extent to which green tea may help promote overall well-being. Some medical studies suggest that the uses for green tea may include the treatment of certain medical issues.

  • In January, 2005, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that: "Daily consumption of tea containing 690 mg catechins for 12 wk reduced body fat, which suggests that the ingestion of catechins might be useful in the prevention and improvement of lifestyle-related diseases, mainly obesity."
  • In February, 2006, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a conclusion involving cognitive function: "A higher consumption of green tea is associated with a lower prevalence of cognitive impairment in humans."
  • And finally, in October 2006, the FDA approved a topical ointment made with green tea extract as a prescription for HPV. The ointment is called Veregen™ (Polyphenon® E).
So the next time you use a tea bag to brew up a batch of green tea, remember that you're literally drinking to your health.

Three Ways to Prepare Herbal Tea

How do I make herbal tea?

Brewing herbal tea is an art form, and there are many ways to prepare it. There are many herbal tea uses, and whether you're drinking it for medicinal purposes or strictly for the great taste, refer to your favorite recipe and, for best results, brew your herbal tea in one of these ways:

  1. Infuse your herbal tea by letting it steep for 30 minutes, or steep your tea and then keep it in the refrigerator overnight for a more robust infusion. Drink the tea with the herbs still floating in it.
  2. Boil fresh tea leaves and fresh herbs in water, let them steep for five minutes, then pour the tea into a strainer to keep it free of loose herbs.
  3. Purchase a quality herbal tea, drop the tea bag into a mug, then pour boiling water over it. Let it steep for 5 minutes and then enjoy.