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Types of Green Tea

Sencha Tea

What is sencha tea?

Sencha is often referred to as the roasted tea because of the method by which it is produced. While many Chinese green teas are first pan fired before processing, Japanese sencha tea is not roasted until later in the cycle. The leaves are first quickly steamed, rolled and dried before baking.

This process, in particular the steaming, which prevents oxidation, provides sencha tea with an earthy, grassy and mellow flavor that some compare to seaweed.

Bancha tea is a common offshoot of sencha tea. Bancha tea comes from the same plant, but is considered a lower grade tea than sencha.

Sencha is also combined with brown rice to create genmaicha. Also known as “people’s tea,” genmaicha was originally consumed by the poor Japanese who used the brown rice as filler. Today, genmaicha is popular with all types of tea drinker and is sometimes combined with a small amount of matcha to strengthen the flavor.

Decaffeinated Green Tea

How much caffeine does decaffienated green tea have?

Green tea has up to 40 milligrams of caffeine in a single cup, which can be harmful to pregnant women and affect people sensitive to caffeine or trying to cut back on their caffeine intake. Tea makers have begun making decaffeinated green tea that has only up to 10 milligrams of caffeine in a cup, an arguably negligible amount.

Green tea leaves are decaffeinated through a process that usually involves solvents like ethyl acetate or carbon dioxide water that absorb the caffeine from the leaves while leaving behind most of the flavor and other nutrients. The remaining tea is a great solution looking for the green tea great taste without the caffeine buzz.

Gunpowder Tea

Where does gunpowder tea come from?

Gunpowder green tea is a form of Chinese green tea made in the Zhejiang Province of China, originally produced during the Tang Dynasty some time during the 1st century. The tea’s chief characteristic is its pellet-like shape. Each leaf, instead of wilted or ground up, is rolled into a small ball that resembles gunpowder pellets.

For processing, the leaves are harvested, wilted, steamed, rolled either by hand or by machine, and then dried again. The rolled leaves last longer because they are less susceptible to absorbing odors, damage and breakage. Gunpowder tea holds the same refreshing and sweet taste with earthy undertones as other green teas, along with a chestnut flavor.

When choosing gunpowder tea, make sure your tea pellets are shiny before you buy them, which is a sign of freshness. Variations in size of the individual pellets are normal, although smaller pellets generally indicate higher quality tea.

Dragonwell Green Tea

What makes Dragon Well tea differnt?

Dragonwell green tea, also called Long-Gin or Lung Ching in Chinese, is named after the village in the mountains of China near West Lake of Hangzhou in the province of Zhejiang where it was first made. The village earned its name for a spring and surrounding mountains where a legendary dragon called home

Dragonwell green tea has very distinguished qualities that separate it from all other green teas. First, dragonwell tea has a particular shape of broad, flat leaves that take a very long time to dry. Dragonwell tea tastes different as well, with a more refreshingly and smooth, sweet and delicate, taste. Some compare the taste to chestnut, with a buttery finish. Dragonwell tea consistently rates among the very best among green teas at tastings.

Dragonwell green tea produces a cup with a yellow-green liquor color, offering a nutty aroma with a hint of earth.

Anji Green Tea

What it Anji white tea and is it a green tea?

The benefits of green tea are not so subtly advertised with anji green tea as the name means “safety and prosperity” in Chinese.

Anji green tea comes from the Zhejiang Province of China and it features a mellow and fresh flavor that soothes the tongue. Green tea enthusiasts also detect nutty undertones in the brew and have been known to describe the taste as “vegetal.”

Like all green tea, anji green tea comes from Camellia sinensis plant, with leaves that are long and thin. The best anji leaves are picked in early spring before undergoing a slight processing transition.

Anji tea can be brewed loose leaf or in bags, and is often combines with other flavors like lemon or jasmine to create a blend. Anji green tea is also known as Anji White Tea because it is so mellow, fine and light in both color and taste when brewed, but it still a green tea.

Tastes of Green Tea

What does green tea taste like?

Green tea does not taste like black tea or oolong tea, even though they come from the same Camellia sinensis plant. While most teas have earthy tastes in common, green teas provide unique subtleties that vary wildly in taste.

Green tea enthusiasts often describe the taste as lighter than black tea beverages and easier on the stomach as well. Specific tastes are often described as fresh, light, minty and even grassy. Some varieties, like Dragonwell, have a sweetness to them, and others feature a bite like an astringent.

Hearing a green tea drinker describe their favorite drink brings to mind the way a wine enthusiast describes a good bottle, with terms like “chestnut,” “orchid” and “woodsy” thrown around. The flavor of the tea can even vary from cup to cup with the same type of tea, altered by the water temperature and steeping time.

Green tea is typically not enjoyed with extra sweeteners and cream as they can mask the subtle offerings.

Japanese Green Tea

What makes Japanese green tea?

Japanese green tea is made for the Camellia sinensis plant and comes from leaves that have gone through a minimal oxidation process to give it a lighter green color and refreshing taste. There are large variations in both the quality and price of Japanese green tea, depending on the quality of the leaves and the care with which they are processed. A few of the many types of Japanese green tea include:

Sencha: A very common Japanese green tea, sencha green tea is also known as roasted green tea because during processing, the leaves are essentially baked for preservation and to add flavor.

Bancha: Bancha tea is generally considered a lower-grade tea than sencha, even though it comes from the same tree. It is harvested later than sencha, giving it an earthy flavor and smell.

Gyokuro: A high-quality Japanese green tea with high caffeine content. Gyokuro tea is grown in the shade rather than the direct sun, providing for unique characteristics. Also known as Jade Dew green tea for its infusion color.

Matcha: A sometimes-expensive tea powder made from tea plants grown in the shade, similar to gyokuro.

The History of Green Tea

When did green tea become popular?

The history of Chinese green tea begins as far back as 2737 BC in China. The ancient Chinese appreciated it for its medicinal qualities, but it was very expensive in ancient China. As technology and cultivation methods improved during the Ming Dynasty, tea became less expensive and spread from the upper classes into the middle classes.

As it spread, sailors and seamen discovered that the vitamin C in tea protected them from scurvy. They embraced green tea, bringing it with them on trading journeys, helping it to spread across oceans. Soon it became a symbol of trade between China and the rest of the world, successfully taking root in Japan, the Middle East, and other Asian cultures.

In Japan, the popularity of green tea began in the Song Dynasty ( 960–1279 AD) where Buddhists drank it as part of a ceremony. The Buddhist priests eventually spread the popularity of green tea throughout the country, which actually started producing the Camellia sinensis plant and different forms of green tea.

Dragonwell Green Tea

What makes Dragon Well tea differnt?

Dragonwell green tea, also called Long-Gin or Lung Ching in Chinese, is named after the village in the mountains of China near West Lake of Hangzhou in the province of Zhejiang where it was first made. The village earned its name for a spring and surrounding mountains where a legendary dragon called home

Dragonwell green tea has very distinguished qualities that separate it from all other green teas. First, dragonwell tea has a particular shape of broad, flat leaves that take a very long time to dry. Dragonwell tea tastes different as well, with a more refreshingly and smooth, sweet and delicate, taste. Some compare the taste to chestnut, with a buttery finish. Dragonwell tea consistently rates among the very best among green teas at tastings.

Dragonwell green tea produces a cup with a yellow-green liquor color, offering a nutty aroma with a hint of earth.

Health Benefits of Green Tea

How does green tea help with weight loss?

There are many different kinds of green tea, but they all contain many health benefits that heal and protect the body. All types of green tea come from the Camellia sinensis plant that is rich in nutrients for the body. Research suggests that drinking any type of green tea lowers the risk for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. It also strengthens your immune system to fight off infection.

All types of green tea carry the powerful antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) that repairs the damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals, which are produced as a byproduct when body tissue consumes oxygen. Oxidative stress has the potential to cause strokes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and coronary heart disease.

By consuming green teas with their antioxidants, you strengthen your body against all those health problems. Green tea has also been shown to have antimicrobial and antifungal properties to fight against gum disease. Lastly, health experts claim it noticeably boosts metabolism to help with weight loss.

The History of Green Tea

When did green tea become popular?

The history of Chinese green tea begins as far back as 2737 BC in China. The ancient Chinese appreciated it for its medicinal qualities, but it was very expensive in ancient China. As technology and cultivation methods improved during the Ming Dynasty, tea became less expensive and spread from the upper classes into the middle classes.

As it spread, sailors and seamen discovered that the vitamin C in tea protected them from scurvy. They embraced green tea, bringing it with them on trading journeys, helping it to spread across oceans. Soon it became a symbol of trade between China and the rest of the world, successfully taking root in Japan, the Middle East, and other Asian cultures.

In Japan, the popularity of green tea began in the Song Dynasty ( 960–1279 AD) where Buddhists drank it as part of a ceremony. The Buddhist priests eventually spread the popularity of green tea throughout the country, which actually started producing the Camellia sinensis plant and different forms of green tea.

Catechins in Green Tea

What is the ingredient that makes green tea so healthy?

There are specific ingredients in green tea that help the body, but one particular nutrient packs a powerful healing punch. Catechin is the nutrient in green tea that creates a bitter taste, but it also efficiently kills bacteria and neutralizes toxins. As a practical effect, this means that the catechins in green tea can help to prevent food poisoning.

Studies have also shown catechin’s ability to reduce the growth of some cancers. Catechin also curbs plaque formation by cariogenic bacteria and even eliminates the bacteria itself, preventing gum disease and helping with bad breath. Catechin also prevents the buildup of LDL cholesterol in the system, and helps guard against coronary heart disease. In addition, catechin suppresses the production of angiotensin II, which leads to high blood pressure. Green tea also has polysaccharides, which have been proven effective in lowering blood sugar. Last but not least, some swear by green tea as a hangover remedy. Drink to good health!

Japanese Green Tea

What makes Japanese green tea?

Japanese green tea is made for the Camellia sinensis plant and comes from leaves that have gone through a minimal oxidation process to give it a lighter green color and refreshing taste. There are large variations in both the quality and price of Japanese green tea, depending on the quality of the leaves and the care with which they are processed. A few of the many types of Japanese green tea include:

Sencha: A very common Japanese green tea, sencha green tea is also known as roasted green tea because during processing, the leaves are essentially baked for preservation and to add flavor.

Bancha: Bancha tea is generally considered a lower-grade tea than sencha, even though it comes from the same tree. It is harvested later than sencha, giving it an earthy flavor and smell.

Gyokuro: A high-quality Japanese green tea with high caffeine content. Gyokuro tea is grown in the shade rather than the direct sun, providing for unique characteristics. Also known as Jade Dew green tea for its infusion color.

Matcha: A sometimes-expensive tea powder made from tea plants grown in the shade, similar to gyokuro.

Tastes of Green Tea

What does green tea taste like?

Green tea does not taste like black tea or oolong tea, even though they come from the same Camellia sinensis plant. While most teas have earthy tastes in common, green teas provide unique subtleties that vary wildly in taste.

Green tea enthusiasts often describe the taste as lighter than black tea beverages and easier on the stomach as well. Specific tastes are often described as fresh, light, minty and even grassy. Some varieties, like Dragonwell, have a sweetness to them, and others feature a bite like an astringent.

Hearing a green tea drinker describe their favorite drink brings to mind the way a wine enthusiast describes a good bottle, with terms like “chestnut,” “orchid” and “woodsy” thrown around. The flavor of the tea can even vary from cup to cup with the same type of tea, altered by the water temperature and steeping time.

Green tea is typically not enjoyed with extra sweeteners and cream as they can mask the subtle offerings.

Sencha Tea

What is sencha tea?

Sencha is often referred to as the roasted tea because of the method by which it is produced. While many Chinese green teas are first pan fired before processing, Japanese sencha tea is not roasted until later in the cycle. The leaves are first quickly steamed, rolled and dried before baking.

This process, in particular the steaming, which prevents oxidation, provides sencha tea with an earthy, grassy and mellow flavor that some compare to seaweed.

Bancha tea is a common offshoot of sencha tea. Bancha tea comes from the same plant, but is considered a lower grade tea than sencha.

Sencha is also combined with brown rice to create genmaicha. Also known as “people’s tea,” genmaicha was originally consumed by the poor Japanese who used the brown rice as filler. Today, genmaicha is popular with all types of tea drinker and is sometimes combined with a small amount of matcha to strengthen the flavor.

Gunpowder Tea

Where does gunpowder tea come from?

Gunpowder green tea is a form of Chinese green tea made in the Zhejiang Province of China, originally produced during the Tang Dynasty some time during the 1st century. The tea’s chief characteristic is its pellet-like shape. Each leaf, instead of wilted or ground up, is rolled into a small ball that resembles gunpowder pellets.

For processing, the leaves are harvested, wilted, steamed, rolled either by hand or by machine, and then dried again. The rolled leaves last longer because they are less susceptible to absorbing odors, damage and breakage. Gunpowder tea holds the same refreshing and sweet taste with earthy undertones as other green teas, along with a chestnut flavor.

When choosing gunpowder tea, make sure your tea pellets are shiny before you buy them, which is a sign of freshness. Variations in size of the individual pellets are normal, although smaller pellets generally indicate higher quality tea.

Anji Green Tea

What it Anji white tea and is it a green tea?

The health benefits of green tea are not so subtly advertised with anji green tea as the name means “safety and prosperity” in Chinese.

Anji green tea comes from the Zhejiang Province of China and it features a mellow and fresh flavor that soothes the tongue. Green tea enthusiasts also detect nutty undertones in the brew and have been known to describe the taste as “vegetal.”

Like all green tea, anji green tea comes from Camellia sinensis plant, with leaves that are long and thin. The best anji leaves are picked in early spring before undergoing a slight processing transition.

Anji tea can be brewed loose leaf or in bags, and is often combines with other flavors like lemon or jasmine to create a blend. Anji green tea is also known as Anji White Tea because it is so mellow, fine and light in both color and taste when brewed, but it still a green tea.

Decaffeinated Green Tea

How much caffeine does decaffienated green tea have?

Green tea has up to 40 milligrams of caffeine in a single cup, which can be harmful to pregnant women and affect people sensitive to caffeine or trying to cut back on their caffeine intake. Tea makers have begun making decaffeinated green tea that has only up to 10 milligrams of caffeine in a cup, an arguably negligible amount.

Green tea leaves are decaffeinated through a process that usually involves solvents like ethyl acetate or carbon dioxide water that absorb the caffeine from the leaves while leaving behind most of the flavor and other nutrients. Carbon dioxide treated green teas can have up to 95% of the antioxidant EGCG that fights cancers, high blood pressure and removes bad LDL cholesterol. The catechins also stay in the tea to stimulate the metabolism, fight gum disease and even reduce the risk to neurological disorders. The remaining tea is a great solution looking for the green tea great taste and health benefit without the caffeine buzz.